History's Fangirl

Oct 01 2014
poliscrutiny101:

Happy 90th Birthday President Jimmy Carter!

poliscrutiny101:

Happy 90th Birthday President Jimmy Carter!

63 notes

Sep 24 2014

sassyabrahamlincoln:

sassyabrahamlincoln:

4 score and 20 years ago i blazed it

now im stoned
image

(Source: sassyabrahamlincoln, via meaghanthespoopywatermelon)

175,603 notes

Sep 19 2014
pbstv:

BINGE ON BURNS: Stream all 14 hours of Ken Burns’s THE ROOSEVELTS: An Intimate History online now via your local PBS station website, Roku and Apple TV.

pbstv:

BINGE ON BURNS: Stream all 14 hours of Ken Burns’s THE ROOSEVELTS: An Intimate History online now via your local PBS station website, Roku and Apple TV.

2,566 notes

Sep 15 2014

p-okemonica:

literatenonsense:

exgynocraticgrrl:

Malcolm X: Our History Was Destroyed By Slavery 

on March 17, 1963 in Chicago.

see how little we get taught about history - I never had any idea why Malcolm X used the ‘X’. 

how come i never knew this damn

(via tryerror-tryit)

134,368 notes

Sep 13 2014
Sep 10 2014
republicofvirtue:

It’s good to see someone who’s finally asking the important questions about U.S. history.

republicofvirtue:

It’s good to see someone who’s finally asking the important questions about U.S. history.

67 notes

Sep 09 2014
  • Elementary School: Here's a basic understanding of history and how the world works.
  • High School: Actually, that's not quite right. Everything is actually a whole lot more complicated than that.
  • College: EVERYTHING YOU KNOW IS WRRROOONNNNGGGG
  • History Channel: Aliens.

208,365 notes

Sep 07 2014

haveyoubeentobahia:

theblindtorpedo:

It’s 2013

THEY STILL HAVEN’T FOUND MADISON

It’s 2014

THEY STILL HAVEN’T FOUND MADISON

(via theblindtorpedo)

48 notes

Aug 27 2014
tryerror-tryit:

i-want-to-be-a-pirate-john:

isherlovewho:

knight-of-knives:

charles-strider:

smalltownfloridabelle:

I’ve been waiting for this to show up on my dash again, it’s been like 2 years wtf.

/screams/ 

hOLY FUCKING SHIT

okay so my history teacher showed me this and you shouldve seen her face when she said the last line

Oh my god. Holy shit. What. the. hell.

I am so tired of seeing this post. Yes, some of these are actual coincidences but some of them are complete bullshit.

tryerror-tryit:

i-want-to-be-a-pirate-john:

isherlovewho:

knight-of-knives:

charles-strider:

smalltownfloridabelle:

I’ve been waiting for this to show up on my dash again, it’s been like 2 years wtf.

/screams/ 

hOLY FUCKING SHIT

okay so my history teacher showed me this and you shouldve seen her face when she said the last line

Oh my god. Holy shit. What. the. hell.

I am so tired of seeing this post. Yes, some of these are actual coincidences but some of them are complete bullshit.

(Source: stopfollowingmethx)

390,346 notes

Aug 24 2014

England in the 1800s

thors-glorious-golden-locks:

This land is my land
And so is this land
This is all my land
And you get no land

(via twogirlsonemajor)

7,959 notes

Aug 19 2014
Aug 04 2014
mumblingsage:

yamino:

iamingrid:

yamino:

omgthatdress:

Half-Mourning Dress
1910-1912
The Victoria & Albert Museum

What’s a “half-mourning” dress?  Mourning in the front, party in the back?

Half-Mourning was the third stage of mourning for a widow. She would be expected to mourn her husband for at least two years, the stages being Full Mourning, Second Mourning and Half-Mourning. The different stages regulated what they would be wearing, with Full Mourning being all black and with no ornamentation, including the wodow’s veil, and the stages after that introducing some jewellery and modest ornamentation. When in Half-Mourning you would gradually include fabrics in other colors and sort of ease your way out of mourning. 
Wow, I am happy you made that joke so I could interpert it as a serious question and have an excuse to ramble on about clothing customs of the past, I am a historical fashion nerd.

That’s very informative, but I’m going to stick with my original head canon:


I love both the informed fashion history and the hilariously off-the-wall halves of this post.

mumblingsage:

yamino:

iamingrid:

yamino:

omgthatdress:

Half-Mourning Dress

1910-1912

The Victoria & Albert Museum

What’s a “half-mourning” dress?  Mourning in the front, party in the back?

Half-Mourning was the third stage of mourning for a widow. She would be expected to mourn her husband for at least two years, the stages being Full Mourning, Second Mourning and Half-Mourning. The different stages regulated what they would be wearing, with Full Mourning being all black and with no ornamentation, including the wodow’s veil, and the stages after that introducing some jewellery and modest ornamentation. When in Half-Mourning you would gradually include fabrics in other colors and sort of ease your way out of mourning. 

Wow, I am happy you made that joke so I could interpert it as a serious question and have an excuse to ramble on about clothing customs of the past, I am a historical fashion nerd.

That’s very informative, but I’m going to stick with my original head canon:

image

I love both the informed fashion history and the hilariously off-the-wall halves of this post.

(via the-doctor-moriarty)

202,321 notes

Aug 01 2014
lipsredasroses:

Am I the only one who got into history because of these books and dolls?
My favorite character was Felicity. I was obsessed with the American Revolution because of her. When I was younger I wanted to know everything about the period and what is was like for her living in the era. The “welcome to felicity’s world” book was held together by tape. I can attribute my interest in women’s history and the American Revolution to her and these books. It saddens me that the Felicity doll was discontinued. I loved the doll as much as the books. I loved going on adventures with Felicity and pretending I lived in Revolutionary Williamsburg. I am glad they still sell the books though.
That being said, I think these books are really important and wish the company would continue to make historical fiction. These books do teach girls about women’s history and get them excited about history. Girls can see themselves in these characters and learn that history isn’t just about a bunch of dead men. They can see that they have a history as well. More era’s in history should be written about. There are so many stories that can be told through these books.
These books will always be special to me. If it wasn’t for Felicity and my love for Revolutionary American as a kid, I don’t know if I would be studying it in grad school.

lipsredasroses:

Am I the only one who got into history because of these books and dolls?

My favorite character was Felicity. I was obsessed with the American Revolution because of her. When I was younger I wanted to know everything about the period and what is was like for her living in the era. The “welcome to felicity’s world” book was held together by tape. I can attribute my interest in women’s history and the American Revolution to her and these books. It saddens me that the Felicity doll was discontinued. I loved the doll as much as the books. I loved going on adventures with Felicity and pretending I lived in Revolutionary Williamsburg. I am glad they still sell the books though.

That being said, I think these books are really important and wish the company would continue to make historical fiction. These books do teach girls about women’s history and get them excited about history. Girls can see themselves in these characters and learn that history isn’t just about a bunch of dead men. They can see that they have a history as well. More era’s in history should be written about. There are so many stories that can be told through these books.

These books will always be special to me. If it wasn’t for Felicity and my love for Revolutionary American as a kid, I don’t know if I would be studying it in grad school.

(via flapper-queen)

126 notes

Jul 22 2014
thats-a-hot-new-york-city-crowd:

this is my new favorite headline

thats-a-hot-new-york-city-crowd:

this is my new favorite headline

(via twogirlsonemajor)

15 notes

Jul 11 2014

awkwardspiritanimals:

In history, we don’t say “I love you,” we say “Hey, remember that awful thing that happened to one of your favorite historical figures,” which translates to “I am going to enjoy your pain until you remind me of something equally painful that happened to one of my favorite historical figures and then we can cry together,” and I think that’s beautiful.

(via navigatorasia)

2,029 notes

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