History's Fangirl

Aug 19 2014
Aug 04 2014
mumblingsage:

yamino:

iamingrid:

yamino:

omgthatdress:

Half-Mourning Dress
1910-1912
The Victoria & Albert Museum

What’s a “half-mourning” dress?  Mourning in the front, party in the back?

Half-Mourning was the third stage of mourning for a widow. She would be expected to mourn her husband for at least two years, the stages being Full Mourning, Second Mourning and Half-Mourning. The different stages regulated what they would be wearing, with Full Mourning being all black and with no ornamentation, including the wodow’s veil, and the stages after that introducing some jewellery and modest ornamentation. When in Half-Mourning you would gradually include fabrics in other colors and sort of ease your way out of mourning. 
Wow, I am happy you made that joke so I could interpert it as a serious question and have an excuse to ramble on about clothing customs of the past, I am a historical fashion nerd.

That’s very informative, but I’m going to stick with my original head canon:


I love both the informed fashion history and the hilariously off-the-wall halves of this post.

mumblingsage:

yamino:

iamingrid:

yamino:

omgthatdress:

Half-Mourning Dress

1910-1912

The Victoria & Albert Museum

What’s a “half-mourning” dress?  Mourning in the front, party in the back?

Half-Mourning was the third stage of mourning for a widow. She would be expected to mourn her husband for at least two years, the stages being Full Mourning, Second Mourning and Half-Mourning. The different stages regulated what they would be wearing, with Full Mourning being all black and with no ornamentation, including the wodow’s veil, and the stages after that introducing some jewellery and modest ornamentation. When in Half-Mourning you would gradually include fabrics in other colors and sort of ease your way out of mourning. 

Wow, I am happy you made that joke so I could interpert it as a serious question and have an excuse to ramble on about clothing customs of the past, I am a historical fashion nerd.

That’s very informative, but I’m going to stick with my original head canon:

image

I love both the informed fashion history and the hilariously off-the-wall halves of this post.

(via the-doctor-moriarty)

171,655 notes

Aug 01 2014
lipsredasroses:

Am I the only one who got into history because of these books and dolls?
My favorite character was Felicity. I was obsessed with the American Revolution because of her. When I was younger I wanted to know everything about the period and what is was like for her living in the era. The “welcome to felicity’s world” book was held together by tape. I can attribute my interest in women’s history and the American Revolution to her and these books. It saddens me that the Felicity doll was discontinued. I loved the doll as much as the books. I loved going on adventures with Felicity and pretending I lived in Revolutionary Williamsburg. I am glad they still sell the books though.
That being said, I think these books are really important and wish the company would continue to make historical fiction. These books do teach girls about women’s history and get them excited about history. Girls can see themselves in these characters and learn that history isn’t just about a bunch of dead men. They can see that they have a history as well. More era’s in history should be written about. There are so many stories that can be told through these books.
These books will always be special to me. If it wasn’t for Felicity and my love for Revolutionary American as a kid, I don’t know if I would be studying it in grad school.

lipsredasroses:

Am I the only one who got into history because of these books and dolls?

My favorite character was Felicity. I was obsessed with the American Revolution because of her. When I was younger I wanted to know everything about the period and what is was like for her living in the era. The “welcome to felicity’s world” book was held together by tape. I can attribute my interest in women’s history and the American Revolution to her and these books. It saddens me that the Felicity doll was discontinued. I loved the doll as much as the books. I loved going on adventures with Felicity and pretending I lived in Revolutionary Williamsburg. I am glad they still sell the books though.

That being said, I think these books are really important and wish the company would continue to make historical fiction. These books do teach girls about women’s history and get them excited about history. Girls can see themselves in these characters and learn that history isn’t just about a bunch of dead men. They can see that they have a history as well. More era’s in history should be written about. There are so many stories that can be told through these books.

These books will always be special to me. If it wasn’t for Felicity and my love for Revolutionary American as a kid, I don’t know if I would be studying it in grad school.

(via flapper-queen)

124 notes

Jul 22 2014
thats-a-hot-new-york-city-crowd:

this is my new favorite headline

thats-a-hot-new-york-city-crowd:

this is my new favorite headline

(via twogirlsonemajor)

15 notes

Jul 11 2014

awkwardspiritanimals:

In history, we don’t say “I love you,” we say “Hey, remember that awful thing that happened to one of your favorite historical figures,” which translates to “I am going to enjoy your pain until you remind me of something equally painful that happened to one of my favorite historical figures and then we can cry together,” and I think that’s beautiful.

(via navigatorasia)

1,941 notes

Jul 10 2014

leninistvaporwave:

"the founders wouldn’t have wanted america to be like this"

1) no one cares

2) times change so the politics must change with it

3) shut up

4) stop 

Also the Founding Fathers were individual people with individual opinions who often didn’t agree on anything.

(Source: frantzofanon, via navigatorasia)

359 notes

Jul 04 2014

likeyouwanna-be-loved:

lanadelreptar:

 ♪ White Lips, Pale Face 

image

*drops bass* MOTHERFUCKING UNITED STATES *guitar solo*

image

I’m not even American but this post is just too good not to reblog, omg

(Source: greatvaluebrand, via homosexualfrustration)

435,735 notes

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cannibaliza:

Alord-kitschener:

Happy US national “Thank you, france, for being petty assholes enough to help us primarily for the sake of telling Britain to get bent”

Also, “Thanks Catherine the Great for not loaning Britain the 20,000 troops they asked for” 

(via historythings)

2,176 notes

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Jul 03 2014
Jul 02 2014

todaysdocument:

ourpresidents:

LBJ Signs the Civil Rights Act of 1964 - Fifty Years Ago Today

On this day in 1964, President  Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 outlawing discrimination based on race, color, national origin, religion, or sex in public accommodations such as hotels, theaters, parks, restaurants, and other public places.

The act also authorized the withdrawal of Federal funds from programs that practice discrimination. It discouraged job discrimination through the creation of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Additionally, it authorized the Attorney General to bring lawsuits against schools practicing segregation, and made the Commission on Civil Rights a permanent organization. 

Images: 

The Civil Rights Act of 1964, page 5. 

President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the 1964 Civil Rights Act with Martin Luther King, Jr. and others behind him.  East Room, White House. 7/2/64.

-from the LBJ Library

Plus more on the Civil Rights Act of 1964:

(via kosmonaunt)

457 notes

Jul 01 2014
Jun 30 2014
Jun 28 2014

lord-kitschener:

Happy 100 year anniversary of the ultimate “boy that escalated quickly” moment

(via fourbrittisheyesonly)

1,021 notes

Jun 09 2014
mapsontheweb:

North American Possessions 1750 - 2005
More ‘possessions’ maps

mapsontheweb:

North American Possessions 1750 - 2005

More ‘possessions’ maps

(Source: Wikipedia)

2,386 notes

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